Summer Fridays: Summer Associates & Interns Have Questions. I Have Answers.

Welcome to Summer Fridays, where I’m answering questions from summer associates and interns. Have a question for me to answer? Email it to thislawyerlife@gmail.com.

Today I respond to a summer associate wondering how to improve his attention to detail.

Question: I just had my mid-summer review. My feedback was generally good, but I was instructed to work on my attention to detail. Any suggestions?

Answer:

Attention to detail is extremely important as a junior associate.  At the same time, it’s an area where a lot of people struggle.  When you are instructed to improve your attention to detail, you’re really being told to stop making little mistakes. This applies to both the substance and formatting of your work product.  Some tips:

1) Proofread everything: memos, document mark-ups, emails, etc. Figure out a foolproof way to catch errors. For me, that means printing out the document and reviewing in hard copy. You could also send it to your secretary to review. Or read it from the bottom up, starting with the last sentence. Reading out of context sometimes makes it easier to catch errors.

2) Pay attention to formatting: Your memo may include a killer legal argument, but if you use multiple fonts or font sizes, inconsistent spacing, weird margins, or present a multi-page wall of text without headers, the reader’s eye is going to be drawn to that stuff, not the substance. Ask for sample work product from your assigning attorney to get a sense for their preferred style and mimic it.

3) Use the Bluebook: Even if you are asked to send your research in an email vs. a formal memo, you should still use proper bluebook format for the cases cited.

4) Review markups without tracked changes: If you are asked to turn edits on a document and to make your edits in tracked changes, look at the document without tracked changes showing before sending it to your supervisor.  This will help you catch any typos, formatting problems, or substantive issues, which are easy to miss in a mark-up.

5) Before handing in an assignment: The last thing you should do before turning in an assignment is to look back at your notes from the initial request to make sure you answered the question asked.

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