Part 4 of 4: Ten Tips to Ace Your Legal Job This Summer

Pic Credit: Pixabay

Today, we’re moving through the rest of my 10 tips to ace your summer legal job:

  • Implement feedback.
  • Use your mentors.
  • Attend the events.
  • Work hard, but don’t play too hard.

Check out the first three posts in the series here, here, and here.

Tip Number 7: Implement Feedback.

Yesterday, I talked about how you should make an effort to seek out feedback during your summer.  But that’s not enough. Truly stellar summer associates implement the feedback they receive. I cannot overstate how impressive it is when I work with a junior attorney who listens to feedback and never makes the same mistake twice.

Do these three things:

  1. When meeting with a supervisor to get feedback, take good notes. Pay attention to comments about formatting in addition to the substance of your work.
  2. Incorporate those notes into a master feedback document. If you have multiple supervisors, add their comments too. Just be sure to jot down which attorney provided the feedback in parentheses after the note.  Organize your master document by topic (formatting, substance) or kind of work product (general, client letter, research memo, pleading). I bet you’ll start to see patterns in the kinds of things that matter to your bosses and the specific issues in your work product.
  3. Every time you start a new assignment, refer back to your notes and find ways to implement prior revisions. So, if you have received general feedback about how to structure an argument, or how to start a letter to opposing counsel, take that into account. But beware, some lawyers have very specific formatting quirks which will not necessarily apply to other attorneys. This is why you should keep track of who provided each bit of feedback.

Tip Number 8: Use your mentors.

At many offices, you will be assigned an official mentor or summer program coordinator.  Don’t be shy about asking them for advice about office norms, questions about particular attorneys you are working for, or available resources. They want you to succeed.

Do these three things:

  1. Reach out to your mentor to schedule meetings or lunches, however your program works. Don’t put all the burden on them to foster the relationship. When you do meet, come prepared with questions but be ready to listen to any advice they offer as well.
  2. About halfway through the summer, check in with your mentor. Are there any big picture issues they can help with? For example, do you really want to try a corporate assignment but have been stuck doing litigation work all summer? Your mentor might be able to help.
  3. Say thank you! Your mentor is taking time out of their busy schedule to help you navigate the summer program. At the end of the summer, take them out for coffee or for a drink. At the least, you should close with a face-to-face conversation thanking them for their help over the summer.

Tip Number 9: Attend the events.

If you’re working at an office with an established summer program, you should make an effort to attend the events scheduled for you – trainings, observational activities, networking events, and social events.  Use these opportunities to make connections at the firm, get your name out, and learn.

Do these three things:

  1. Show up to every social event unless you have a good reason to skip it.
  2. Use the events to meet people generally. Don’t just talk to the other summers. You would be surprised how often this happens. Make it a goal to meet one new firm attorney at every event.
  3. Use the events to meet key people. If there is a particular attorney you want to work with, seek them out at an event. Don’t be super aggressive or weird about it. Just say hello, introduce yourself, and let the conversation flow from there.

Tip Number 10: Work hard, but don’t play too hard.

I have very fond memories of my summer associate position and the summer I spent at a government agency. Yes, it’s a 12 week long job interview in some ways, but it’s also an opportunity to meet lots of people and have a good time.  So have fun, but remember, you’re always on the job, even if the job is taking you to a Broadway show and bar afterward.  As I’ve said before, memories are long.  You don’t want to be the summer associate everyone gossips about for years to come.  People at my firm still reference the summer associate who got into a fistfight at an event afterparty.  More than ten years ago.

Do these three things:

  1. If you drink, don’t overdo it. Know your limits and pace yourself.
  2. Don’t feel like you need to close down every single afterparty, all summer.
  3. If you do stay out late, don’t show up late and hungover to work. I once went to lunch with a summer associate who wore sunglasses inside the entire time and talked about the strip club he closed down the night before. That’s what I remember about him, not his work.

Enjoyed this week’s tips but have some questions left I can help you answer? Send me an email at thislawyerlife@gmail.com. I’ll be answering reader questions throughout the summer in my Summer Fridays posts.